So, you’ve heard someone utter the phrase CoR in a meeting at your workplace, maybe when talking about your transport vendor and you’re wondering what that means.

CoR simply means Chain of Responsibility. It is the acronym for chain of responsibility which is basically a phrase which industry has adopted in exchange for the National Heavy Vehicle National Law, which is also known as the HVNL.

Yep, transport safety in Australia has many acronyms. I came up with Grab, Snatch and Take to make light heart of the GST, but I’m yet to come up with one for CoR but I’m open for suggestions.

Simply speaking, if you have vehicles working in your supply chain that have an ability to weigh at anytime more than 4.5 tonne, whether you own the truck, lease the truck or employ another business that owns the truck, for deliveries or receipt of goods or passengers through the business you own or operate, then by virtue of what you do, you are liable under the Heavy Vehicle National Law, also known as CoR.

There is much to understand when it comes to CoR and our customers come to us, for help with their understanding of CoR legislation. CoR legislation requires all parties to comply with the law, importantly though, through an active safety system. The HVNL requires anyone with a transport task in their business to provide, so long as it is reasonably practicable, an active safety system.

Most businesses we interact with are focused on how they make money, not how they spend it. But it is important to understand the risks around not complying with CoR legislation or any other legislation for that matter, as the risk in not complying can wipe a profit margin completely from a bottom line in many small to medium sized businesses, depending on the penalty imposed.

It isn’t always the case that the penalty is financial by nature and relevant to the size of the business. Directors have also been required to resign their position in some circumstances when they have been found guilty as the driver behind the poor safety practises within an organisation.

When clients come to us, we immediately suggest a gap analysis around their CoR practises to ascertain their level of compliance with the HVNL, with your duty to provide a reasonably practicable active safety system. It is the best way to ascertain your road map from where you currently are to where you need to be. We’ve provided gap analysis for many companies big and small, while providing commercially sound advice to promote a reasonably practicable active safety system many times over.

For a small sum, a gap analysis will give you your road map, which can also be considered a project plan, which is an important point to understand as this also is your latitude should something go wrong. A gap analysis proves your duty to reasonably practicably assume a process to remove the risk from your business. It is by definition, the start of your active safety system.

So if your not sure about CoR or unsure of your risks within your business, the suggestion is to give your closest chain of responsibility consultant a call and request them to provide you with a gap analysis immediately, to offset the legislative risk that is currently at very much alive within your business, should you have any resemblance of a transport task in your operation.

So, you’ve heard someone utter the phrase CoR in a meeting at your workplace, maybe when talking about your transport vendor and you’re wondering what that means.

CoR simply means, Chain of Responsibility. It is the acronym for chain of responsibility which is basically a phrase which industry has adopted in exchange for the National Heavy Vehicle National Law, which is also known as the HVNL.

Yep, transport safety in Australia has many acronyms. I came up with Grab, Snatch and Take to make light heart of the GST, but I’m yet to come up with one for CoR but I’m open for suggestions.

Simply speaking, if you have vehicles working in your supply chain that have an ability to weigh at anytime more than 4.5 tonne, whether you own the truck, lease the truck or employ another business that owns the truck, for deliveries or receipt of goods or passengers through the business you own or operate, then by virtue of what you do, you are liable under the Heavy Vehicle National Law, also known as CoR.

There is much to understand when it comes to CoR and our customers come to us, for help with their understanding of CoR legislation. CoR legislation requires all parties to comply with the law, importantly though, through an active safety system. The HVNL requires anyone with a transport task in their business to provide, so long as it is reasonably practicable, an active safety system.

Most businesses we interact with are focused on how they make money, not how they spend it. But it is important to understand the risks around not complying with CoR legislation or any other legislation for that matter, as the risk in not complying can wipe a profit margin completely from a bottom line in many small to medium sized businesses, depending on the penalty imposed.

 

It isn’t always the case that the penalty is financial by nature and relevant to the size of the business. Directors have also been required to resign their position in some circumstances when they have been found guilty as the driver behind the poor safety practises within an organisation.

When clients come to us, we immediately suggest a gap analysis around their CoR practises to ascertain their level of compliance with the HVNL, with your duty to provide a reasonably practicable active safety system. It is the best way to ascertain your road map from where you currently are to where you need to be. We’ve provided gap analysis for many companies big and small, while providing commercially sound advice to promote a reasonably practicable active safety system many times over.

For a small sum, a gap analysis will give you your road map, which can also be considered a project plan, which is an important point to understand as this also is your latitude should something go wrong. A gap analysis proves your duty to reasonably practicably assume a process to remove the risk from your business. It is by definition, the start of your active safety system.

So if your not sure about CoR or unsure of your risks within your business, the suggestion is to give your closest chain of responsibility consultant a call and request them to provide you with a gap analysis immediately, to offset the legislative risk that is currently at very much alive within your business, should you have any resemblance of a transport task in your operation.